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4.3 Immigrants

4.3.1 Declaration of Satisfactory Immigration Status

4.3.2 Verification

4.3.2.1 Reverification of Immigration Status

4.3.2.2 Reasonable Opportunity Period for Verification of Immigration Status

4.3.3 Immigrants Eligible for BadgerCare Plus

4.3.3.1  Qualifying Immigrants

4.3.3.2 Lawfully Present Immigrant Children, Young Adults, and Pregnant Women

4.3.4 Public Charge

4.3.5 Immigration and Naturalization Service Reporting

4.3.6 Continuous Presence

4.3.7 Undocumented Non-Citizens

4.3.8 Immigration Status Chart

4.3.9 Iraqis and Afghans With Special Immigrant Status

4.3.9.1 Counting Refugee-Related Income

4.3.9.2 Refugee Medical Assistance

4.3.10 Military Service

4.3.11 Victims of Trafficking

 

“Immigrants” refers to all people who reside in the U.S., but are not U.S. citizens or nationals. Immigrants may be eligible for BadgerCare Plus and other categories of health care benefits, if they meet all eligibility requirements and in addition:

 

Immigrants, who do not meet these additional requirements, may still be eligible for the BadgerCare Plus Prenatal Program or Emergency Services.

 

Before health care benefits may be issued to immigrants, their immigration status must be verified with the Department of Homeland Security through the Federal Data Sources Hub or SAVE (See Section 4.3.2 Verification). Prior to verification of immigration status, benefits may also be issued for a temporary period under a Reasonable Opportunity Period (see Section 4.3.2.2 Reasonable Opportunity Period for Verification of Immigration Status).

4.3.1 Declaration of Satisfactory Immigration Status

To qualify for BadgerCare Plus, persons who are not U.S. citizens or nationals must declare (or have an adult member of their household declare on his or her behalf) a satisfactory immigration status, except for:

 

This declaration is normally provided as part of a signed application for health care that provides some basic information regarding the immigration status of household members. However, in some cases, a person may only indicate on his or paper or ACCESS application that he or she is not a U.S. citizen and not provide any information about his or her immigration status. In such a situation, it is not known whether the person is telling us that he or she is lawfully present in the U.S. (i.e., that they have a satisfactory immigration status) or that they are undocumented.

 

Federal law requires that agencies obtain a declaration of satisfactory immigration status before taking any action to verify a person’s immigration status, including granting eligibility during a reasonable opportunity period (see Section 4.3.2.2 Reasonable Opportunity Period for Verification of Immigration Status). To meet this declaration requirement, everyone who indicates that he or she is not a U.S. citizen or national must provide one of the following:

 

Anyone who is required to and fails to provide immigration information or a declaration (or have an adult in the household provide it on his or her behalf) within standard verification timeframes must be denied health care benefits and must not be granted a reasonable opportunity period.

4.3.2 Verification

Primary verification of immigration status is done through the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) by use of the Federal Data Services Hub (FDSH) or SAVE, which is an automated telephone and computer database system. A worker processing an application can simply enter the immigrant’s alien number and immigration document type into CWW.  That information, along with demographic information of the individual, is sent in real time to the FDSH.  The FDSH will immediately return verification of the immigrant’s status, date of entry, and the date the status was granted if it’s available from the Department of Homeland Security, along with other information.  If the FDSH cannot provide verification of the immigration status, workers are directed to seek secondary verification though SAVE or take other action.  

 

The verification query via the FDSH or SAVE most likely results in returning the latest date of any qualified alien status update for an individual, not his or her original date of arrival. The only way to obtain an accurate date of arrival for those who do not meet an exemption category and who report a date of arrival prior to August 22, 1996, is through the secondary verification procedure. The FDSH or SAVE will describe the immigrant’s current status which may have changed from the original status. In some situations described later workers will need to maintain the original status in CARES.

 

It may be necessary to complete a secondary or third level verification procedure with the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), including confirming the date of arrival, in the following situations:

 

An Immigration Status Verifier at DHS will research the alien's records and complete the response portion of the verification request.

 

Consult the SAVE manual for more information.

 

Additional verifications from sources other than the Department of Homeland Security are sometimes required as well. For example, persons who are in an immigration status subject to the 5-year bar and who indicate that they, their spouse or parent is in the military service or is a veteran, that military status must also be verified.

 

The following documents are considered valid verification of military service:

 

Immigration statuses for most immigrants are permanent and most often change when the immigrant become a U.S. citizen.  For this reason, immigration status for most members should only be verified once, unless the status for an individual is questionable or it’s a status subject to reverification (see Section 4.3.2.1 Reverification of Immigration Status).  Even if an immigrant loses health care eligibility for a period of time, his or her immigration status does not need to be re-verified unless the status is subject to reverification.

 

See Process Help, Section 44.3.9 Immigrant/Refugee Information Page for additional information on using the FDSH or the procedures in the SAVE Manual.

4.3.2.1 Reverification of Immigration Status

The following persons with a Registration Status Code of 20 – Lawfully Residing are required to verify their immigration status at application and renewal, even if they have previously verified their immigration status:

 

Typically, these persons will be labelled with a “Non-immigrant” status by the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services. Reverifications are not to be done for children and pregnant women with other Registration Status Codes, as those statuses are permanent.

 

The reverification requirement is only to be applied at the time of subsequent applications, renewals, or when an agency receives information indicating that the member may no longer be lawfully residing in the U.S. For pregnant women, the reverification is not to occur until the renewal is done to determine the woman’s eligibility after the end of the 60-day postpartum period.

4.3.2.2 Reasonable Opportunity Period for Verification of Immigration Status

Applicants who have declared that they are in a satisfactory immigration status, are otherwise eligible and are only pending for verification of immigration status must be certified for health care benefits within the normal application processing timeframe (30 days from the filing date). They are to continue receiving health care benefits for which they are eligible, while the IM agency waits for immigration status verification. Applicants who are otherwise eligible and are only pending for verification of immigration will have 90 days after receiving a request for immigration verification to provide the requested documentation. This 90-day period is called the Reasonable Opportunity Period (ROP).  The 90-day ROP starts on the date after the member receives the notice informing the member of the need for the member to provide immigration verification by the end of the reasonable opportunity period. Federal regulations require that we assume a minimum five-day time frame for applicants to receive notices.  For this reason, we must set the end of the ROP no less than 95 days after the date on the notice, even when the member receives the notice in less than 5 days. It also means that if a member shows that a notice was received more than 5 days after the date on the notice, we must extend the deadline to 90 days after the date the member received the notice.

The 90-day ROP applies when immigration verification is needed from a person at any time: applications, renewals and when a person is newly requesting benefits on an existing case.

 

Applicants are eligible for benefits beginning with the first of the month of application or request.  However, they are not eligible for backdated health care benefits while waiting for verification of their immigration status. Once verification of an eligible immigration status is provided, the applicant’s eligibility must then be determined for backdated health care benefits if they have been requested.

 

When requested verification is not provided by the end of the ROP, the worker must take action within 30 days to terminate eligibility, unless one of the following situations occurs where the worker is allowed to extend the reasonable opportunity period:

 

Applicants who fail to provide verification of immigration status and later reapply for health care benefits are not eligible for another ROP.  If verification of immigration status is still needed, eligibility may not be granted until verification is provided. The regular verification deadlines apply.

 

Persons whose health care benefits were terminated for failure to provide verification of immigration status by the end of the ROP are not eligible to have their benefits continued if they request a fair hearing.

 

A person may receive a reasonable opportunity period more than once in a lifetime in the following situations:

 

Example 1: Vladimir is a 12-year-old lawfully present in the United States on a visa applying for health care benefits with his parents. When verification is attempted through the FDSH, the response requires the worker to submit a secondary verification request to SAVE. Vladimir is otherwise eligible for BadgerCare Plus, so the worker confirms BadgerCare Plus eligibility and sends the ROP notice to the family while waiting for the SAVE response. A week later, SAVE verifies the child is lawfully present in the U.S. under a Temporary Protected Status and the reasonable opportunity period ends.
 
A year later, the case is up for renewal. Since Vladimir has a Registration Status Code of 20 – Lawfully Residing, his immigration status must be verified again. Once more, the FDSH informs the worker that verification of the child’s status must be done through SAVE. If Vladimir is otherwise eligible for BadgerCare Plus, the worker must again confirm eligibility without delay and send a new reasonable opportunity period notice to the family. Again, Vladimir may be eligible for up to 90 days after receiving the notice while the worker is waiting to verify his immigration status.

 

Benefits issued during a reasonable opportunity period to a person otherwise eligible for BadgerCare Plus are not subject to recovery, even if the person turns out to have an immigration status that makes him or her ineligible for BadgerCare Plus benefits.

4.3.3 Immigrants Eligible for BadgerCare Plus

Immigrants may be eligible for BadgerCare Plus if they meet all other eligibility requirements and are either Qualifying Immigrants or are Lawfully Present as described below.

4.3.3.1  Qualifying Immigrants

Immigrants of any age meeting the criteria listed below are considered Qualifying Immigrants.

 

  1. A refugee admitted under INA Section 207. A refugee is a person who flees his or her country due to persecution or a well-founded fear of persecution because of race, religion, nationality, political opinion, or membership in a social group. An immigrant admitted under this refugee status may be eligible for BadgerCare Plus even if his or her immigration status later changes.

 

  1. An asylee admitted under INA Section 208. Similar to a refugee, an asylee is a person who seeks asylum and is already present in the U.S. when he or she requests permission to stay. An immigrant admitted under this asylee status may be eligible for BadgerCare Plus even if his or her immigration status later changes.

 

  1. An immigrant whose deportation is withheld under INA Section 243(h) and such status was granted prior to April 1, 1997, or an immigrant whose removal is withheld under INA Section 241(b)(3) on or after April 1, 1997. An immigrant admitted under this status may be eligible for BadgerCare Plus even if his or her immigration status later changes.

 

  1. A Cuban/Haitian entrant. An immigrant admitted under this Cuban/Haitian entrant status may be eligible for BadgerCare Plus even if his or her immigration status later changes.

 

Haitians paroled into the U.S. through the Haitian Family Reunification Parole Program are considered Cuban/Haitian entrants.

 

  1. An American Indian born in Canada who is at least 50 percent American Indian by blood or an American Indian born outside the U.S. who is a member of a federally recognized Indian tribe.

 

  1. Victims of a severe form of trafficking in accordance with 107(b)(1) of the Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000 (P.L. 106-386). See Section 4.3.11 Victims of Trafficking.

 

  1. An immigrant lawfully admitted for permanent residence under INA 8 USC 1101 et seq.*

 

  1. An immigrant paroled into the U.S. under INA Section 212(d)(5).*

 

  1. An immigrant granted conditional entry under immigration law in effect before April 1, 1980 [INA Section 203(a)(7)].*

 

  1. An immigrant who has been battered or subjected to extreme cruelty in the U.S. and meets certain other requirements.*

 

  1. An immigrant whose child has been battered or subjected to extreme cruelty in the U.S. and meets certain other requirements.*

 

  1. An immigrant child who resides with a parent who has been battered or subjected to extreme cruelty in the U.S. and meets certain other requirements.*

 


*If these immigrants lawfully entered the U.S. on or after August 22, 1996, they must also meet one of the following:

4.3.3.2 Lawfully Present Immigrant Children, Young Adults, and Pregnant Women

Children younger than 19 years old, adults younger than 21 years old who are residing in an IMD, and pregnant women do not have to wait five years to be eligible for full-benefit Medicaid and BadgerCare Plus if they meet one of the following:

 

Women who have an immigration status requiring a five-year waiting period before being eligible for BadgerCare Plus will have the waiting period lifted when their pregnancy is reported to the agency. The lift on the five-year waiting period continues for an additional 60 days after the last day of pregnancy and through the end of the month in which the 60th day occurs.

 

Example 2: Rose has an immigration status that requires a five-year waiting period before being eligible for BadgerCare Plus. Her date of entry to the U.S. was two years ago, so she is not eligible for BadgerCare Plus. In March, Rose reports that she is pregnant. She meets the other financial and nonfinancial requirements, so she is determined eligible for BadgerCare Plus as a pregnant woman. Rose’s last day of pregnancy is September 5. The 60th day after her last day of pregnancy is November 4, so Rose’s BadgerCare Plus coverage will end November 30. Starting in December, Rose is again subject to the five-year waiting period from her date of entry to the U.S.

 

Children younger than 19 years old, young adults younger than 21 years old who are residing in an IMD, and pregnant women may qualify for BadgerCare Plus if they are lawfully present in the U.S. under any of the nonimmigrant statuses listed in the table below and are otherwise eligible.

 

Eligible Nonimmigrant Statuses for Children, Young Adults in an IMD, and Pregnant Women

Description

Class of Admission Code or Section of Law Citation

Aliens currently in temporary resident status pursuant to section 210 or 245A of the Act.

S16, S26, W16, W25, W26, W36 or

8 CFR 103.12(a)(4)(i)

Aliens currently under Temporary Protected Status (TPS)

pursuant to section 244 of the Act. Child accompanying or following to join a K-3 alien.

TPS, 8 CFR 103.12(a)(4)(ii)

Family Unity beneficiaries pursuant to section 301 of Pub. L.

101-649. (These are the spouses and unmarried children of individuals granted temporary or permanent residence under Section 210 or 245A above.)

FUG, 8 CFR 103.12(a)(4)(iv)

Aliens currently under Deferred Enforced Departure (DED)

pursuant to a decision made by the President.

8 CFR 103.12(a)(4)(v)

Aliens currently in deferred action status pursuant to Service

Operations Instructions at OI 242.1(a)(22).

8 CFR 103.12(a)(4)(vi)

Aliens who are the spouse or child of a United States citizen

whose visa petition has been approved and who have a pending application for adjustment of status

8 CFR 103.12(a)(4)(vii)

Legal non-immigrants from the Compact of Free Association states (Republic of the Marshall Islands, the Federated States of Micronesia and the Republic of Palau) who are considered permanent non-immigrants.

NA

Spouse/dependent of a non-immigrant foreign government official, dependent of foreign government official

A-2

Attendant, servant, or personal employee of A-1 or A-2 and members of immediate family.

A-3

Domestic servant of certain non-immigrants or US Citizens

B-1, B-2

Treaty Trader/Investor, spouse and children

E-1, E-2, E-3;  8 USC 1101(a)(15)(E)

Students; their spouse and children

F-1, F-2, F-3;  8 USC 1101(a)(15)(F)

Spouse/dependent of foreign government official or representative of international organization and their dependents, servants or employees

G-1, G-2, G-3, G-4, G-5; 8 USC 1101(a)(15)(G)

Spouse of a temporary worker (other than registered nurse) with "specialty occupation" admitted on the basis of professional education, skills, and/or equivalent experience

H1-B, H4

Spouse or children of an exchange visitor

J-2

An alien who is the fiancée or fiancé of a U.S. citizen entering solely to conclude a valid marriage contract.

K-1

Child of K-1

K-2

Spouse of a U.S. citizen who is a beneficiary of a petition for status as the immediate relatives of a U.S. citizen (I-130).

K-3

Child accompanying or following to join a K-3 alien.

K-4

Individuals in the U.S. who have been transferred from a subsidiary, affiliate, or branch office overseas to the U.S. to work in an executive, managerial, or specialized knowledge capacity; their spouse and children

L-1, L-2, L-3

Student pursuing a full course of study at an established vocational or other recognized nonacademic institution (other than in a language training program); their spouse and children

M-1, M-2

Parent of an alien classified SK3 or SN3

N-8

Child of N-8 or of an alien classified SK1, SK2, SK4, SN1, SN2, SN4.

N-9

Temporary worker to perform work in religious occupations.

R1

Spouse and children of R1

R2

An alien who is in possession of critical reliable information concerning a criminal organization or enterprise, is willing to supply or has supplied such information to Federal or State law enforcement authorities or a Federal or State court; and whose presence in the United States the Attorney General determines is essential to the success of an authorized criminal investigation or the successful prosecution of an individual involved in the criminal organization or enterprise

8 U.S.C. 1101(a)(15)(S)(i)

An alien who the Secretary of State and the Attorney General jointly determine is in possession of critical reliable information concerning a terrorist organization, enterprise, or operation; is willing to supply or has supplied such information to Federal law enforcement authorities or a Federal court; will be or has been placed in danger as a result of providing such information; and is eligible to receive a reward from the State Department.

8 U.S.C. 1101(a)(15)(S)(ii)

An alien who is the spouse, married and unmarried sons and daughters, and parents of an alien in possession of critical reliable information concerning either criminal activities or terrorist operations.

8 U.S.C. 1101(a)(15)(S)

Individuals who have suffered substantial physical or mental abuse as victim of criminal activity.

U-1

An alien who is the spouse, child, unmarried sibling or parent of the victim of the criminal activity above.

U-2, U-3, U-4, U-5

An alien who are the spouses or children of an alien lawfully admitted for permanent residence and who have been waiting since at least December 2000 for their visa application to be approved.

V-1, V-2, V-3

 

Immigrants who do not appear in the lists above (e.g., someone with a status of DACA ) and who apply for BadgerCare Plus and meet all eligibility requirements except for citizenship are entitled to receive BadgerCare Plus Emergency Services only (see Chapter 39 Emergency Services).

 

Pregnant immigrants who do not appear in the list above and who apply for BadgerCare Plus and meet the eligibility requirements, except for citizenship, are entitled to receive BadgerCare Plus Prenatal Program benefits (see Chapter 41 BadgerCare Plus Prenatal Program) and/or BadgerCare Plus Emergency Services (see Chapter 39 Emergency Services).

 

Immigration status is an individual eligibility requirement. An individual's immigration status does not affect the eligibility of the BadgerCare Plus Group. The citizen spouse or child of an ineligible immigrant may still be eligible even though the immigrant is not.

4.3.4 Public Charge

The receipt of BadgerCare Plus by an undocumented, non-qualifying, or qualifying immigrant or by the children or spouse for whom the individual is legally responsible does not establish the person as a public charge.

 

Undocumented, non-qualifying, or qualifying immigrants are considered to be a public charge if, while receiving BadgerCare Plus, they are in a medical institution for more than the length of a rehabilitative stay.

 

Undocumented, non-qualifying, or qualifying immigrants concerned about being considered a "public charge," should be directed to contact the INS field office to seek clarification of the difference between rehabilitative and other types of institutional stays.

4.3.5 Immigration and Naturalization Service Reporting

Do not refer an immigrant to INS unless information for administering the BadgerCare Plus program is needed (for example, if BadgerCare Plus needs to determine an individual's immigration status or an individual’s location for repayment or fraud prosecution).

4.3.6 Continuous Presence

Certain non-citizens who arrived in the U.S. on or after August 22, 1996, are subject to a five-year ban on receiving federal benefits (including BadgerCare Plus and Medicaid), other than emergency services. For these immigrants, the five-year ban is calculated beginning on the day on which they gain qualified immigrant status. However, certain applicants who alleged an arrival date in the U.S. before August 22, 1996, and obtained legal qualified immigrant status after August 22, 1996, are not subject to the five-year ban and may be eligible to receive federal BadgerCare Plus enrollment. The immigrants described below, who apply for BadgerCare Plus and meet all eligibility requirements, are entitled to receive BadgerCare Plus benefits:

 

An individual meets the "continuous presence" test if he or she:

 

To establish continuous presence, require a signed statement from the applicant stating he or she was continuously present for the period of time in question. The signed statement will be sufficient unless a worker believes the information is fraudulent or further information received now indicates that it is questionable.

 

Below is one example of a signed statement:

 

I, first and last name, hereby declare that I have continuously resided in the United States between the day I arrived in the United States, date here, and the date I received qualified alien status, date here.  I have not left the United States in that time for any single period of time longer than 30 days or for multiple periods totaling more than 90 days.

 

Applicant/Authorized Representative Signature, Date 

4.3.7 Undocumented Non-Citizens

In cases in which it is known that the applicant originally arrived in the U.S. in undocumented status, do not attempt to verify his or her status with the USCIS. Undocumented immigrants do not have any official documentation regarding their date of arrival. Therefore, if a worker needs to establish a date of arrival for a qualified immigrant who originally arrived as an undocumented immigrant prior to August 22, 1996, alternative methods need to be used. In such cases, the applicant must provide at least one piece of documentation that shows his or her presence in the U.S. prior to August 22, 1996. This may include pay stubs, a letter from an employer, lease or rent receipts, or a utility bill in the applicant's name.

 

Example 3: The legal status conferred on a non-citizen by immigration lawToshi entered the U.S. February 2, 2004, with qualified immigrant status. She is applying for BadgerCare Plus in February 2008. The IM worker should first determine if she is in one of the immigrant categories exempt from the five-year ban. If Toshi is not exempt, then she must wait five years before qualifying for BadgerCare Plus. She can be enrolled in BadgerCare Plus after February 2, 2009.

 

Example 4: Shariff arrived as a student in June 2002. On June 5, 2006 he was granted asylum. The five-year ban does not apply because asylees are exempt from the ban. Secondary verification is not necessary. Shariff is eligible to be enrolled in BadgerCare Plus if he meets other financial and non-financial criteria.

 

Example 5: Katrin entered the U.S. March 3, 1995, and gained qualified immigrant status June 20, 1995. She is applying for BadgerCare Plus in February 2008. She is a qualified immigrant who entered the U.S. prior to August 22, 1996. There is no need to apply the five-year ban. She is eligible for BadgerCare Plus if she meets other financial and non-financial criteria.

 

Example 6: Juan entered the U.S. as an undocumented immigrant on April 1, 1996. He applied for BadgerCare Plus on February 1, 2008. His immigration status changed to lawful permanent resident on March 3, 2005. He has signed a self-declaration stating he remained continuously present in the U.S. between April 1, 1996, and March 3, 2005. Additionally, Juan provided a copy of a lease showing a date prior to August 1996. He is eligible for BadgerCare Plus if he meets other financial and non-financial criteria.

 

Example 7: Elena entered the U.S. on July 15, 1999, on a temporary work visa and obtained qualified immigration status on October 31, 2004. She applied for BadgerCare Plus February 1, 2008, and has been in the U.S. for over five years. Elena is not in one of the immigrant categories exempt from the five-year ban. Therefore, the five-year ban would have to be applied since Elena's original entry date is after August 22, 1996. The five-year clock starts from the date she obtained qualified immigration status, so she would be able to apply for BadgerCare Plus after October 31, 2009.

 

Example 8: Tomas entered the U.S. on April 8, 1996, on a visitor’s visa. He obtained qualified alien status on September 22, 2003. Tomas applied for Medicaid on May 5, 2008. The IM worker completed primary verification and USCIS responded with the date of entry as September 22, 2003, since that was the last updated date on his status. The IM worker needs to confirm with the applicant that this is the original date he arrived in the U.S. Tomas explained that he arrived in 1996; therefore, the IM worker needs to conduct secondary verification. USCIS responds and confirms that the original date of arrival was April 8, 1996. Additionally, the IM worker needs to confirm that the applicant was continuously present between April 8, 1996, and September 22, 2003. Tomas signs a self-declaration confirming this and is found eligible. If the IM worker had used September 22, 2003, as the date of entry in CARES, Tomas would have been incorrectly subject to the five-year ban and not eligible until September 22, 2008.

4.3.8 Immigration Status Chart

CARES TCTZ Code

Immigration Status

Arrived Before August 22, 1996

Veteran*

Arrived before

August 22, 1996

Arrived on or after August 22, 1996

Veteran*

Arrived on or after August 22, 1996

Children under age 19 and pregnant women; Arrived on or after August 22, 1996

01

Lawfully admitted for

permanent residence

Eligible

Eligible

Ineligible for 5 years

Eligible

Effective October 1, 2009 Eligible

02

Permanent resident

under color of law

(PRUCOL)

Ineligible

Ineligible

Ineligible

Ineligible

Ineligible

03

Lawfully present under

Section 203(a)(7)

Eligible

Eligible

Ineligible for 5 years

Eligible

Effective October 1, 2009 Eligible

04

Lawfully present under

Section 207(c)

Eligible

Eligible

Eligible

Eligible

Eligible

05

Lawfully present under

Section 208

Eligible

Eligible

Eligible

Eligible

Eligible

06

Lawfully present under

Section 212(d)(5

Eligible

Eligible

Ineligible for 5 years

Eligible

Effective October 1, 2009 Eligible

07

IRCA (No longer valid)

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

08

Lawfully admitted -

temporary

Ineligible

Ineligible

Ineligible

Ineligible

Ineligible

09

Undocumented Immigrant

Ineligible

Ineligible

Ineligible

Ineligible

Ineligible

10

Illegal Immigrant

Ineligible

Ineligible

Ineligible

Ineligible

Ineligible

11

Cuban/Haitian Entrant

Eligible

Eligible

Eligible

Eligible

Eligible

12

Considered a Permanent Resident by USCIS

Ineligible

Ineligible

Ineligible

Ineligible

Eligible

13

Special agricultural

worker under Section

210(A)

Ineligible

Ineligible

Ineligible

Ineligible

Eligible

14

Additional special

agricultural worker

under Section 210(A)

Ineligible

Ineligible

Ineligible

Ineligible

Eligible

15

Withheld deportation -

Section 243(h)

Eligible

Eligible

Eligible

Eligible

Eligible

16

Battered Immigrant

Eligible

Eligible

Ineligible for 5 years

Eligible

Effective October 1, 2009 Eligible

17

Amerasian

Eligible

Eligible

Eligible

Eligible

Eligible

18

Foreign Born Native American

Eligible

Eligible

Eligible

Eligible

Eligible

19

Victims of Trafficking**

Eligible

Eligible

Eligible

Eligible

Eligible

20

Lawfully Residing

Ineligible

Ineligible

Ineligible

Ineligible

Eligible

21

Victims of Trafficking Subject to 5 Year Bar

Eligible

Eligible

Ineligible for 5 years

Eligible

Eligible

 

* "Veteran" includes certain veterans and active duty servicemen and women, their spouses, dependent children, or certain surviving spouses.

**Some victims of trafficking may need to provide certain verification to be exempt from the five-year bar. See Section 4.3.11 Victims of Trafficking for more information.

4.3.9 Iraqis and Afghans With Special Immigrant Status

Beginning December 19, 2009, Special Immigrants from Iraq or Afghanistan (Class of Admission Codes SI-1, 2, 3, 6, 7, and 8) are to be treated like they are refugees when determining their eligibility for BadgerCare Plus for as long as they have this Special Immigrant status. This policy applies to these immigrants regardless of when they received this status.

 

Class of Admission Code

Description

CARES Alien Registration Status Code

SI1

Nationals of Iraq or Afghanistan serving as interpreters with the U.S. Armed Forces

Code 04

SI2

Spouses of an SI1

Code 04

SI3

Children of an SI1

Code 04

SI6

Nationals of Iraq or Afghanistan serving as interpreters with the U.S. Armed Forces

Code 04

SI7

Spouses of an SI6

Code 04

SI8

Children of an SI6

Code 04

4.3.9.1 Counting Refugee-Related Income

Refugee Cash Assistance Program payments are not counted as income for BadgerCare Plus. Refugee Cash Assistance is administered by W-2 agencies and is made available for refugees who do not qualify for W-2.

 

Refugee "Reception and Placement" payments are not counted as income for BadgerCare Plus. Reception and Placement payments are made to refugees during the first 30 days after their arrival in the U.S. Reception and Placement payments are made by voluntary resettlement agencies and may be a direct payment to the refugee individual or family or to a vendor.

4.3.9.2 Refugee Medical Assistance

If an individual does not meet the other eligibility requirements for BadgerCare Plus, he or she may apply for Refugee Medical Assistance, which is not funded by BadgerCare Plus. Refugee Medical Assistance is a separate benefit from BadgerCare Plus but provides the same level of benefits. Refugee Medical Assistance is available only in the first eight months after a special immigrant’s date of entry. If it is not applied for in that eight-month period, it cannot be applied for later. Iraqi immigrants may be eligible for Refugee Medical Assistance for eight months, and Afghan immigrants may be eligible for Refugee Medical Assistance for six months.

 

While W-2 agencies have contractual responsibility for providing Refugee Medical Assistance, they need to coordinate with economic support agencies to ensure eligibility for all regular BadgerCare Plus subprograms is tested first.

 

More information about this program is in the Wisconsin Works (W-2) Manual, Section 18.3 Refugee Medical Assistance.

 

Note: The federal Medicaid eligibility for all other refugees admitted under Alien Status Code 04 remains the same.

4.3.10 Military Service

Applicants with an immigration status that requires them to be in that immigration status for five years before being eligible for health care benefits are exempt from this five-year bar if they meet any of the following criteria related to military service:

4.3.11 Victims of Trafficking

Applicants claiming to be victims of trafficking (or have a Class of Admission (COA) code indicating that they are a victim – ST6 or T1), have not resided in the United States for at least five years, and are at least 18 years of age, must have a victim certification from the federal Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR) in the Department of Health and Human Services to be treated like a refugee and be exempt from the five-year bar.

 

Persons with a COA code indicating they are a child, spouse, or parent of a trafficking victim (Codes ST0, ST1, ST7, ST8, ST9, T2, T3, T4, T5, or T6) are exempt from the five-year bar and do not need certification from the ORR. Victims of trafficking who are under 18 at the time they apply do not require a certification from the ORR. Victims of Trafficking who are 18 or older and do not have the certification will be subject to the five-year bar.

 
 

 

This page last updated in Release Number: 19-01

Release Date: 04/19/2019

Effective Date: 03/02/2019